Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology

Available with a foundation yearAvailable with a industrial/professional experience

a model brain

One of the most challenging problems in modern biology is to understand the behaviour of both animals and humans in terms of brain mechanisms and evolutionary principles. Approaches to this problem are diverse, varying from the study of biological systems at the molecular level, to analysis of human performance. By combining studies of major topics in experimental psychology and neuroscience, this course provides a broad background in this exciting field of behavioural science.

The psychology component covers topics such as: how humans and animals think (cognitive processes); how the world is sensed (perception); comparative and developmental studies; and abnormal psychology. The neuroscience component of the course covers topics such as animal behaviour, learning and memory, the action of drugs on the nervous system, and how humans and animals sense and respond to their environment.

Our degree is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), which means as well as providing a solid foundation for a career in the life sciences, it also constitutes your first step towards professional chartered psychologist status.

Course units

Click on the year you are interested in to view the combination of modules available for Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology. (Please note that sometimes we can refer to modules as course units or units.)

Second year [click to expand/contract]
Final year [click to expand/contract]

Disclaimer: Our modules teach the current trends in life sciences. Consequently, details of our modules may vary over time. The University therefore reserves the right to make such alterations to modules as are found to be necessary. Before accepting your offer of a course, it is essential that you are aware of the current terms on which the offer is based. This includes the modules available to you. If in doubt, please contact us.

Course units

Click on the year you are interested in to view the combination of modules available for Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology. (Please note that sometimes we can refer to modules as course units or units.)

Second year [click to expand/contract]
Final year [click to expand/contract]

Disclaimer: Our modules teach the current trends in life sciences. Consequently, details of our modules may vary over time. The University therefore reserves the right to make such alterations to modules as are found to be necessary. Before accepting your offer of a course, it is essential that you are aware of the current terms on which the offer is based. This includes the modules available to you. If in doubt, please contact us.

Students say...

Zahra Khatib

“My course allows me the rare opportunity to appreciate abstract scientific concepts on real-life and visible levels. I am looking forward to undertaking research projects in my second and final years, not only for the chance to focus on the areas of Neuroscience and Psychology which have most interested me so far, but also to help in deciding where next to steer my post-graduate education.”

Zahra Khatib

Max Drakeley

“My course is the only course that has joins with Psychology for half of my credits. This means that you get experience in the nitty gritty Neuroscience aspect, as well as the behavioural side of Psychology. While being part of the Life Sciences, you have teaching and support from both faculties which is always useful. The South Africa animal behaviour Easter field course has been my favourite experience "in" Manchester so far. The students and staff were always fun to work with and my project was so interesting to research and write up. Not to mention the stunning scenery and exquisite food.”

Max Drakeley (with Industrial Experience)

Careers

Some graduates from this degree choose to pursue careers in clinical psychology (our degree is accredited by the British Psychological Society ). This is a very competitive profession that requires further training and professional experience. Alternatively, Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology graduates are well qualified to work as researchers in universities, pharmaceutical and bioscience companies and institutes. Some of our graduates progress into laboratory-based careers in clinical or technical roles which do not involve research. The transferable skills you will develop will also leave you well equipped for a wide range of careers outside the lab. Recent graduates have secured roles as:

  • Research Scientist at a multinational consumer products company
  • Research Assistant at a university
  • Trainee Science Teacher
  • Psychology Assistant at a prison

Please see the Faculty of Life Sciences Careers page  for more information.

Course director

Ingo Schiessl

Ingo Schiessl

If you compare our current knowledge of neuroscience to the knowledge in physics we would find ourselves around the time of Galileo. This is very exciting news for you because you are about to start a journey in one of the fastest progressing fields of science today. Of course this is my personal and very subjective view but I hope that once you start to immerse yourself in our current understanding of neuroscience from the molecular level to the whole brain and behaviour you will agree with me that there is so much more to be discovered and that you want to be a part of it.

"... you are about to start a journey in one of the fastest progressing fields of science today."

I myself ended up in neuroscience research in a somewhat roundabout way. I studied physics at the University of Regensburg, Germany, for my BSc and masters degree. I then went on to qualify as a medical physicist during two years working in the radiation therapy department of the university hospital in the above town. My experience with brain imaging analysis during that time lead me on to do a PhD in the field of neuroscience in a collaboration between the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, and UCL in London. This project then resulted in a post-doc position here in Manchester and finally a Lectureship in 2003.

The research in my lab together with many collaborators is heavily imaging focussed and ranges from basic brain imaging and imaging in stroke research to imaging the human eye in conditions like primary open angle glaucoma (POAG).

I was very happy to take over as programme director for the Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology BSc degree programme from Stuart Allan in 2011. This course is excellent. I think one of the hall marks of this course is that you will be taught by some of the best scientist in their respective fields and get the opportunity for research in your projects at the cutting edge of knowledge. And maybe even more important to you is that even though The University of Manchester is a big place we manage to be accessible to your academic queries and give one to one advice.

Together with Ellen Poliakoff in the School of Psychological Science, I am looking forward to meeting you during your time here in the Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology programme and wish you all the best.